Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Prompt #22: Shoes

Take a good look at your shoes, create a poem naming all the places you've been with your shoes.
Consider using the Ghazal form.


Here's an example of a Ghazal:



A Ghazal called Desire

Dreamy, the tank swirls with this tale’s airy surface.
Along the glass, catfish whiskers skim the surface.

Water churned on the bubbles, blew
perfect O’s to her lips kissing the hushed surface.

Love began like this, long ago, in a pond
where she swam against its smooth surface.                          

Stones and mud grazed belly to bare belly,
hidden from those who looked below the surface.                                       

Staring at the tank’s natural light, she wants to dive
again, and break this hour’s surface.

She gazes beyond glass, and sees her sleek body
shadowing the catfish’s slippery surface.

M.J.Iuppa

This was first published on Ghazal.  Thanks, Gene Doty!

Notice the couplets have to be discrete (stand on their own as well as work together in poem)
Ist stanza has the repeat word at the end of its lines.  After 1st stanza, it's always the second line of each couplet that has the repeat word.


So the repeat word would be "shoes" for this challenge, or whatever you want to do.

 Could be boots, flip-flops, sandals, barefoot and so on.






Monday, April 14, 2014

Prompt #21: Femme Fatale

Write a poem in  "Film Noire," using the language of the 40's.  Invent your Femme Fatale.

** Time to watch: Double Indemnity.  Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray. 

 

Prompt #20: Silence

What is your silence?  Write a poems that describes your silence.
Where do you find it?   Is it warm or cold?  What does it give you?
 

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Prompt #19: Get to Going Poem

Write a poem about your daily commute.  On foot, in car, by train, in subway, by bicycle, some things are always the same (name them in poem) and one thing will be different today (name it.  How does it affect the poem?). 

Now get to going!

Friday, April 11, 2014

Prompt #18: Something Small

Write a cinquain about something that is "small."

A cinquain is a form invented by Adelaide Crapsey in homage to haiku.  She was from Rochester NY.
The form is based on syllable count per line:

2
4
6
8
2

You may use simile (like, as or than) in your poem.  The lines may enjamb (flow from one line to next).
Cinquains are addictive.  Once you get started, it's hard to turn back.

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Prompt #17:Ode or Anti-Ode

Write an Ode in honor of something. (see Neruda's Odes for inspiration).  If you not in the mood to celebrate; then write an Anti-Ode. Years ago, my students created fantastic Anti-Odes.  They focused
on what they didn't like. One student was totally creeped out by flies.  So hers was an "Anti-Ode to a Fly."

Hope all of you are keeping up with the challenge.


Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Prompt#16: Go Take A Walk

Divide your notebook page into four quadrants by drawing  a horizontal line  and vertical line on page.

By doing this you should have four boxes. 
Now create headers for each box.

In first box, the header should read: images; second box, sounds and smells, third box, things in action and fourth box any words seen (can be on buildings, billboards, people's tee shirts, posters, street signs, any signage)

Go for walk.  Write down  what you see, hear, taste touch smell , according to the categories of each box.

From the lists, create a poem  with cascading lines.  Enjoy your walk.

After you write yours, then read Frank O'Hara's "A Step Away from Them."  I love his Lunch Poems collection.